CalTrout, EDC Plan to Sue Federal Government Over Deaths of Endangered Steelhead Trout

CalTrout and Environmental Defense Center yesterday issued a 60-day Notice of Violations and Intent to Sue to the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation alleging violations of the Endangered Species Act.

The letter puts the Bureau on notice for its actions causing deaths of endangered Southern California steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at Hilton Creek, below the Bradbury Dam and Cachuma Reservoir.

Between March 2013 and March 2014, the Bureau’s pumps failed to properly function and release water, causing Hilton Creek to run dry, and leading to the death of roughly 176 federally-endangered Southern California steelhead.  This past week, the pumps failed yet again – an outage which has killed over 200 steelhead.

Download (PDF, 193KB)

For coverage of the pump failures and action taken by CalTrout and EDC read the Independent article and the Noozhawk story.

 

Historic Mono Basin Agreement To Settle Decades Of Fighting Over Mono Lake Water

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 27, 2013

Historic Mono Basin Agreement approved by LA Dept. of Water & Power; CalTrout and Other Groups Sign Off on Water-Sharing Plan

Eastern Sierras, CA – Decades of strife over how much water could be diverted out of four key Mono Lake tributaries to the benefit of Los Angeles water users came to an end today when the Board of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) voted to approve a historic settlement agreement among LADWP, non-profit fisheries and water resources conservation organization California Trout (CalTrout), the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (DFW) and the Mono Lake Committee.

“It has taken years of challenging and complex negotiations to identify feasible options for implementing this important agreement, and we are eager to see the terms of the agreement put in to action,” noted Mark Drew, Eastern Sierra Manager for CalTrout. “Scientific rigor and analyses played an important role in helping us to figure out what kind of flows are needed, as well as how they are to be delivered, to support healthy fisheries and further restore the Mono Lake ecosystem. We are grateful to LADWP, CA Department of Fish & Wildlife and the Mono Lake Committee for working with us to come to an agreement on these complex issues.”

The settlement agreement lays out the details of a plan to implement several actions, including a significant investment in upgrading Grant Dam and the subsequent delivery of long-term flows, an extensive monitoring program, oversight and bringing to closure earlier requirements stemming from the 1994 decision and subsequent Restoration Orders from the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB).

After the landmark decision in 1994 set the stage for the restoration of the streams, in 1998, the SWRCB appointed a group of stream scientists to analyze conditions and define recommendations for restoring flows to four Mono Lake tributary creeks. After a decade of research and monitoring, in 2010 the scientists presented their long-term flow recommendations.

Once provided, LADWP had the right to contest implementation of the recommended flows. Based on an analysis of how feasible it was to implement the recommendations the LADWP objected to agreeing to implement the recommended flows. In order to resolve disagreements over this issue, CalTrout joined LADWP in making a formal request to the SWRCB to grant the parties time to engage in a facilitated negotiation process. Today’s decision by LADWP Board of Commissioners, settles the end of ongoing litigation and negotiations around Mono Basin water distributions since the early 1980s.

“Lee Vining and Rush Creeks once supported some of the finest rainbow and brown trout fisheries in California, but ongoing diversions to support urban growth in Los Angeles devastated these fish populations,” said California Trout Executive Director Jeff Thompson. “Although the conditions of these Mono Lake tributaries have improved since their low point in the early 1980s, more work needs to be done to create lasting improvements. With the settlement finally in place, Mono Lake and four of its most important tributaries will receive flows that will improve the Mono Basin fisheries and LADWP will be in compliance with important state regulations.”

LADWP’s diversions out of the Mono Basin supported an exploding urban population at the expense of the health of a unique and ancient ecosystem. The resulting dramatic environmental degradation led to a series of landmark lawsuits challenging LADWP’s water export license under Public Trust doctrine, the California Environmental Quality Act, and State Fish & Wildlife (formerly Fish & Game) regulations. California Trout was a lead plaintiff in two of the most important lawsuits leading up to the settlement now under consideration by LADWP.

“California Trout, Audubon Society, and the Mono Lake Committee were some of the earliest groups to recognize the importance of restoring and protecting the entire Mono Basin watershed. The litigation that led up to these successful negotiations played an important role not just for Mono Lake and its tributaries, but also for protecting riparian habitat throughout California,” added attorney Richard Roos-Collins, legal counsel for CalTrout.

The settlement agreement was approved by the LADWP Board at its August 27, 2013 meeting. The agreement will now be presented to the State Water Resources Control for final approval and implementation.

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Mammoth Creek Settlement Ensures Water Flows For Fish, People

For Immediate Release – July 12, 2013

Contact – Mark Drew, California Trout
760-924-1008, mdrew@caltrout.org

MAMMOTH CREEK SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT REACHED

Collaborative Approach Secures Water for Residents, Adequate flows for Fish

Mammoth Lakes, Calif. – Today the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) and the Mammoth Community Water District (MCWD) announced settlement agreements in two lawsuits over water allocation in Mammoth Creek. These settlements both herald a hopeful future for fair water allocation locally, in the Eastern Sierras, as well as for urban users in the Los Angeles area.

The settlement of these lawsuits also enables a 2010 settlement agreement regarding bypass flows in Mammoth Creek to take effect. This earlier settlement agreement, among MCWD, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (formerly Fish and Game), and non-profit watershed advocacy group California Trout, ensured adequate flows in Mammoth Creek to support fisheries while also providing sufficient water supplies for area residents and businesses.

“The recent turn of events around Mammoth Creek speaks to the power of collaboration and science-based negotiations when it comes to tackling California’s complex water challenges,” said Mark Drew, California Trout’s Eastern Sierra Manager. “With these settlement agreements in place, local residents will have their water needs met and essential flows for fisheries will remain intact.”

Drew continued, “We have seen that when all parties come to the table with respect for one-another, an open mind, and an eye on the science it is possible to find a way forward that everyone can support. These settlements give us every reason to be hopeful that we might also see a similarly positive resolution around water rights challenges in the nearby Mono Basin.”

Background

Establishing appropriate bypass flows on Mammoth Creek has been a contentious issue for decades. The Mammoth Community Water District (District) drafted an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) in 2009 to study the options for balancing the needs of people who rely on the creek’s water, recreational offerings, and the fish that depend on it for survival. Out of concern for the health of fisheries in the creek, California Trout and the Department of Fish and Wildlife engaged in litigation to secure improved flows on behalf of fish in Mammoth Creek as well as Hot Creek and the Upper Owens River, into which the creek flows.

The litigation eventually led to a science-based settlement agreement that secures sufficient flows for fisheries, initiated a Mammoth Lakes Basin fisheries enhancement fund, provides for the ongoing monitoring of groundwater extraction to ensure that in-stream flows are not negatively impacted by the practice, and requires implementation and monitoring of a comprehensive water conservation plan in the basin. The State Water Resources Control Board approved by the Final EIR and the Settlement Agreement in 2012.

Although the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power initially objected to the plan and engaged in litigation over its provisions, the recent settlement of that litigation will now allow the plan to move forward.

For more information about water allocation in the Mammoth Basin, or to learn more about the settlement process, call Mark Drew at 760-924-1008 or mdrew@caltrout.org.

Emergency Regulations Close Suction Dredge Mining “Loophole” In CA Law

Suction dredge mining was effectively banned in the state of California since 2009, but a few miners tried to exploit a “loophole” in the law, eliminating their suction dredge’s sluice box (part of the overly specific legal definition of a suction dredge) and mining anyway.

California’s Department of Fish and Wildlife passed emergency rules which disallowed the use of any suction dredge mining equipment, protecting our waterways from toxic levels of mercury and habitat disruption.

Those rules just took affect, and CalTrout wants to commend Fish and Wildlife’s quick reaction to the resurgence in suction dredge mining. Below is a press release from several organizations involved in the fight to protect our rivers.

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For Immediate Release, July 1, 2013

Contact:
Craig Tucker, Karuk Tribe, (916) 207-8294
Jonathan Evans, Center for Biological Diversity, (415) 436-9682 x 318
Glen Spain, PCFFA, (541) 689-2000

Suction Dredge Mining Loophole Officially Closed

Many Recreational Miners Will Need to Pack up Mining Gear Immediately

SACRAMENTO, Calif.— On Friday, June 28th the Office of Administrative Law formally approved emergency rules proposed by California Department of Fish and Wildlife that close a so-called “loophole” in California’s suction dredge ban.

The proposed rules stemmed from an emergency request from a coalition of tribal, environmental and fisheries groups. California Department of Fish and Wildlife proposed the emergency rules on June 7, 2013 to crack down on an upsurge of unregulated suction dredge mining in the state. The environmentally harmful mining process has been banned in California since 2009, but since early this spring miners have been making equipment modifications to suction dredges to exploit what they perceived as a “loophole” in the ban.

“We are very pleased with California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s decision to act quickly. This decision ensures that California’s water quality, fisheries, and cultural sites will be protected from suction dredges and similar forms of mechanized recreational mining,” said Leaf Hillman, Director of Natural Resources for the Karuk Tribe.

Suction dredge mining uses machines to vacuum up gravel and sand from streams and river bottoms in search of gold. California law currently prohibits “any vacuum or suction dredge equipment” from being used in California waterways. But because narrow state rules previously defined a suction dredge as a hose, motor and sluice box, miners are simply removing the sluice box — an alteration that leaves dredge spoils containing highly toxic mercury piling up along waterways. The sluice box is one of several methods to separate gold from dredge spoils. Under the new regulation, the use of any vacuum or suction dredge equipment (i.e., suction dredging) is defined as the use of a suction system to vacuum material from a river, stream or lake for the extraction of minerals. (Cal. Code Regs., tit. 14, § 228, subd. (a).

“Suction dredge mining in any form pollutes our waterways with toxic mercury and destroys sensitive wildlife habitat,” said Jonathan Evans with the Center for Biological Diversity. “California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s decision will make our rivers safer for wildlife, fisheries and our families.”

Unregulated suction dredge mining harms important cultural resources and state water supplies. It also destroys sensitive habitat for important and imperiled wildlife, including salmon and steelhead trout, California red-legged frogs and sensitive migratory songbirds. The Environmental Protection Agency and State Water Resources Control Board urged a complete ban on suction dredge mining because of its significant impacts to water quality and wildlife from mercury pollution; the California Native American Heritage Commission has condemned suction dredge mining’s impacts on priceless tribal and archeological resources.

The coalition that submitted the formal rulemaking petition includes the Center for Biological Diversity, the Karuk tribe, Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations, Institute for Fisheries Resources, Friends of the River, California Sportfishing Protection Alliance, Foothills Anglers Association, North Fork American River Alliance, Upper American River Foundation, Central Sierra Environmental Resource Center, Environmental Law Foundation and Klamath Riverkeeper. The coalition is represented by Lynne Saxton of Saxton & Associates, a water-quality and toxics-enforcement law firm.

Background

Suction dredge mining has a history of controversy. California courts have repeatedly confirmed that it violates state laws and poses threats to wildlife, and the state government has placed a moratorium on the destructive practice. Last year California Gov. Jerry Brown continued a moratorium initiated by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on suction dredge mining until the state develops regulations that pay for the program and protect water quality, wildlife and cultural resources. Regulations adopted by state wildlife officials earlier in 2012 failed to meet these legislative requirements.

In March 2013 a coalition including environmental organizations, fishermen and the Karuk tribe submitted a formal petition to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife asking the agency to close a loophole that allows recreational miners to return to suction dredging by making equipment modifications that sidestep state law and worsen impacts to the environment. When state wildlife officials denied the March request the coalition filed an emergency request on May 28, 2013 to close the loophole, which prompted the current regulatory reform.

The harm done by suction dredging is well documented by scientists and government agencies: It damages habitat for sensitive, threatened and endangered fish and frogs, and releases toxic mercury plumes left over from the Gold Rush into waterways.

Environmental analysis by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife identified several of the impacts:

  • Mobilizes and discharges toxic levels of mercury, harming drinking-water quality and potentially poisoning fish and wildlife
  • Harms fish, amphibians and songbirds by disrupting habitat
  • Causes substantial adverse changes statewide in American Indian cultural and historical resources

To watch video of recent illegal suction dredge mining click here.

The Karuk Tribe is the second largest federally recognized Indian Tribe in California. The Karuk have been in conflict with gold miners since 1850. Karuk territory is along the middle Klamath and Salmon Rivers.
www.karuk.us

The Center for Biological Diversity is a national, nonprofit conservation organization with more than 500,000 members and online activists dedicated to the protection of endangered species and wild places.
www.biologicaldiversity.org

Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations is trade association of commercial fishermen on the west coast dedicated to assuring the rights of individual fishermen and fighting for the long-term survival of commercial fishing as a productive livelihood and way of life.
www.pcffa.org

S. Craig Tucker, Ph.D.
Klamath Coordinator
Karuk Tribe

www.klamathrestoration.org

Sizable Snowfall Loss Predicted in Southern California Mountains

LA-area mountains may lose 30-40% of annual snowfall by mid-century according to new UCLA climate study

LA snow loss

The mountains surrounding Los Angeles will lose up to 42% of their snow by mid-century.

Southern California has long been known as the place where you could ski the nearby mountains in the morning and surf in afternoon.

By mid-century, those days may be gone. This “Climate Change In L.A.” press release was published by Climate Resolve — a Southern California group aimed at “Inspiring Los Angeles to meet the challenge of climate change.”

You can find more on their Climate Change LA website, but those who fish Southern California’s mountain streams for trout will want to pay attention.

Press Release

Today, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and UCLA Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences released Mid- and End-of-Century Snowfall in the Los Angeles Region, the second in a series of studies commissioned by the City of Los Angeles, funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. The snowfall study provides detailed forecasts of diminishing snowfall in Southern California Mountains between 2041-2060 and between 2081-2100.

The full study is available here.

This study predicts that, by mid-century, Los Angeles area mountains – including the San Bernardinos, San Gabriels, San Jacintos, and the Tehachapis – will lose upwards of 42% of their annual snowfall, given greenhouse gas emissions continue in a “business as usual” scenario. By the end of the century, the loss of snow will be closer to 70%.

Fortunately, if immediate substantive efforts are made to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, mid-century and end-of-century loss of snow could be limited to 31%.

Despite the threats of climate change, Los Angeles’ future is not yet decided. The City of Los Angeles has already taken big steps to reduce our carbon impact – including the decision to move off of coal by 2025 and investing in public transportation throughout the region.

While we will have to adapt to a changing climate with less snowfall and increased temperatures, Los Angeles has the opportunity to lead cities across the globe to a better future, ensuring that we will not only survive climate change, but thrive.

The full study is available here.

Water Talks: The Science Behind the Hat Creek Restoration Plan

For Immediate Release: May 16th, 2013

Contact: Meadow Barr, 530-859-1411

Shasta County-CA
Siskiyou County-CA

Did you know that Hat Creek was once California’s premier spring creek fishery? Come learn about Hat Creek’s unique characteristics, why it fell on hard times, and what is being done to fix it.

The public is invited to an educational presentation, “Water Talks: The Science Behind the Hat Creek Restoration Plan” on Wednesday June 5th 2013 from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm at the McConnell Foundation headquarters building located at 800 Shasta View Drive in Redding. The informational Water Talks are free and open to the public. Please RSVP to mbarr@caltrout.org as seating is limited at the McConnell Foundation.

“Water Talks: The Science Behind the Hat Creek Restoration Plan” will feature presentations from:

  • Andrew Braugh Mount Shasta Conservation Manager, California Trout
  • Tony Orozco Hydrologist, PG&E
  • Jeff Cook Ecologist, Spring Rivers
  • Carson Jeffres Staff Researcher, UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences
  • Erin Donley Student Trainee, USDA Agricultural Research Service and Ph.D. student, UC Davis Department of Entomology
  • Mike Berry Senior Environmental Scientist, Department of Fish and Wildlife.

In November of 2012 California Trout received a grant from the California Natural Resources Agency to restore fish habitat and create new recreational opportunities on Hat Creek. Andrew Braugh, California Trout’s Mount Shasta Conservation Manager will be managing the project.

“The Hat Creek Restoration project is an example of what can be accomplished when public and private organizations work together to manage northern California’s natural resources. Hat Creek was once California’s most important spring creek wild trout fishery; our restoration partnership is committed to bringing this special place back to life,” Braugh said.

“Presentations like these help me understand the broader scope of the project and encourage me to contribute in the capacity that I can,” stated Tony Orozco, a PG&E hydrologist. “I will discuss the unique characteristics of the Hat Creek Watershed, the hydrology of Hat Creek and provide an overview of PG&E’s power generation on Hat Creek,” he said.

Jeff Cook, an ecologist at Spring Rivers has been conducting studies, working, and fishing on Hat Creek since 1996 and a part of the Hat Creek Restoration planning since 2003.  His studies have included trout spawning surveys, rare species surveys, identification of sediment sources and influx rates, and in-stream sediment transport studies.  “In my portions of the talk I will cover the geologic history and geomorphology of Hat Creek as well as the existing ecological conditions and how they tie to the science behind the planned restoration activities,” he said.

“My research interest is understanding how nutrients in the underlying geology can be incorporated into groundwater, emerge as springs, and ultimately provide the base of a productive foodweb,” said Carson Jeffres, Staff Researcher for the UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences.

Jeffres’ presentation will set the stage for Erin Donley, who is a student researcher at the USDA and a Ph.D. student in the Department of Entomology at UC Davis. “I will cover the unique characteristics of spring creek food web dynamics,” she said.

The Department of Fish and Wildlife has managed a portion of Hat Creek as a Wild Trout water since 1972. “I will share the results of recent trout population and creel studies, and discuss how restoration actions will benefit wild trout populations,” said Mike Berry, a senior environmental scientist with the Department.

Attendees can expect to come away with a better understanding of the story behind why Hat Creek needs restoration, the science behind the restoration plan, and the restoration actions beginning this summer.

Water Talks are an ongoing series of informational and educational presentations with local and regional experts sharing their knowledge with the public on a range of water related topics. The purpose of Water Talks is to provide a place to learn about water related topics. Water Talks is a project of California Trout. California Trout is a nonprofit organization dedicated to seeking workable solutions for fisheries restoration throughout California.” For more information contact Meadow Barr, California Trout Outreach Consultant at 530-859-1411 or mbarr@caltrout.org.

Hat-Creek-Water-Talks-Flyer

Water Talks: Reconnecting Salmon to Shasta Mountain: Shasta Dam Fish Passage Feasibility

For Immediate Release: May 9th, 2013

Contact: Meadow Barr, 530-859-1411

Siskiyou County-CA

Did you know that four runs of salmon, and steelhead existed in the Upper Sacramento, McCloud and Pit Rivers prior to the building of Shasta Dam? Come learn about why salmon reintroductions are being considered, and steps being taken to assess the feasibility of accomplishing reintroductions above Shasta Dam.
The public is invited to an educational presentation, “Water Talks: Reconnecting Salmon to Shasta Mountain: Shasta Dam Fish Passage Feasibility” on Wednesday May 29th 2013 from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm at the Mount Shasta Sisson Museum located at 1 North Old Stage Road in Mount Shasta. The informational Water Talks are free and open to the public.

“Water Talks: Reconnecting Salmon to Shasta Mountain: Shasta Dam Fish Passage Feasibility” will feature presentations from:

  • Craig Ballenger Historian, Author and Fly Fishing Ambassador, California Trout
  • Brian Ellrott Recovery Coordinator, NOAA Fisheries
  • John Hannon Fisheries Biologist, Bureau of Reclamation and
  • Alice Berg Fisheries Biologist, NOAA Fisheries.

Local historian and California Trout’s fly fishing ambassador Craig Ballenger, will provide an introduction to the evening’s topic with a short history of the salmon and steelhead runs on the McCloud, Upper Sacramento and Pit Rivers.  “The spring fed rivers that flow into Shasta Dam once supported four runs of salmon and runs of steelhead,” he said.

Brian Ellrott, the Central Valley Chinook salmon and steelhead Recovery Coordinator for NOAA Fisheries, will discuss the importance of providing salmon with more spawning habitat.  “Historically, there were four independent populations of winter-run Chinook salmon spawning in the Sacramento River basin; today, there is only one population and it is on a path to extinction”, Brian stated.  “To avoid extinction and ultimately recover winter-run Chinook salmon, the feasibility of returning these fish to their historic spring-fed spawning areas must be explored.”

“It’s been a long time since anadromous fish had access to the habitat above Shasta Dam and watershed conditions have changed since then,” said John Hannon, a Fisheries Biologist with the Bureau of Reclamation. “We’re looking at the habitat to make sure it’s still compatible with the targeted salmon runs and will be working with other agencies and interested stakeholders to design and conduct studies to learn whether we may be able to feasibly reintroduce salmon back into some of their historic habitat above Shasta Dam,” he explained.

“Stakeholders in regions above large head dams have concerns about how reintroducing endangered species could affect them,” said Alice Berg, who is a fisheries biologist and an Endangered Species Act Specialist for NOAA Fisheries. “While we are still in the early stages of identifying what tools may be applicable above Shasta Dam, I will explain the suite of tools used to address these concerns as well as a case study on how these tools have been used in other regions in the Pacific Northwest,” she said.

Attendees can expect to come away with a better understanding the history of salmon runs above Shasta Dam, why the National Marine Fisheries Service is considering the possibility of reintroducing salmon above Shasta Dam, and the process and timeline of studying the feasibility of reintroductions.

Water Talks are an ongoing series of informational and educational presentations with local and regional experts sharing their knowledge with the public on a range of water related topics. The purpose of Water Talks is to provide a place to learn about water related topics. Water Talks is a project of California Trout. California Trout is a nonprofit organization dedicated to seeking workable solutions for fisheries restoration throughout California.” For more information contact Meadow Barr, California Trout Outreach Consultant at 530-859-1411 or mbarr@caltrout.org.

Reconnecting-Salmon-to-Shasta-Flyer

Water Talks: Results Of The Mt. Shasta Watershed Analysis Discussion On February 12

 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 30th 2013
Contacts: Meadow Barr, California Trout: 530-859-1411
Kara Baylog, Shasta Valley RCD: 530-926-2259
Mount Shasta Watershed Analysis Seen as Important for Region
 
Siskiyou County, CA — An informational presentation on the methods and results of the May 2012 Forest Service Shasta McCloud Management Unit Mt. Shasta Watershed Analysis will be held Tuesday February 12th, 2013 from 6 pm to 8 pm at the Mount Shasta Sisson Museum, located at 1 North Old Stage Road in Mount Shasta. The presentation is being hosted as a part of both California Trout’s Water Talks series and the Shasta Valley RCD’s Rainbow Ridge Forest Stewardship Series.

“The first Watershed Analysis to be done on the entire Mt. Shasta volcano is a valuable informational resource for the community,” said Meadow Barr, California Trout’s Water Talks program manager. “We are happy to partner with the Shasta Valley RCD to facilitate the Forest Service’s presentation of their analysis,” she continued.

Kara Baylog, Shasta Valley RCD’s Watershed Coordinator explained that, “the Watershed Analysis brings together so many aspects of ecological management that we and CalTrout felt it was applicable to our respective educational series.”

“My hope for the presentation is that not only will people learn a little more about the Mount Shasta Watersheds, but that they will also come to understand the questions we should be asking to effectively manage our private and public forestlands in other watersheds close to home, including on Rainbow Ridge, where we are working with groups of landowners to facilitate their own stewardship plans,” she said.

The Watershed Analysis can be read here. Feedback on the document will be accepted at the presentation on February 12th, and feedback forms will be provided for those who would like to submit comments at a later time.

This educational workshop is free and open to the public. For more information contact Kara Baylog, Shasta Valley RCD 530-926-2259 or Meadow Barr, California Trout 530-859-1411.
 

Watershed Analysis Flyer

Release: Stanford Investigated For Searsville Dam ESA Violations

Stanford Under Investigation for Possible Endangered Species Act Violations at Searsville Dam

Palo Alto — The National Marine Fisheries Service has launched an investigation into whether Stanford University’s operation of Searsville Dam has violated the Endangered Species Act by harming steelhead trout and other species threatened with extinction.

The dam blocks steelhead from migrating to almost 20 miles of historically accessible habitat upstream, it dewaters Corte Madera Creek below the dam, degrades water quality and habitat downstream and causes other negative impacts that harm threatened species.

Searsville Dam

The Searsville Dam blocks steelhead access and dewaters San Francisquito Creek.

For over a decade, American Rivers, members of the Beyond Searsville Dam coalition, CalTrout and other stakeholders have tried to work collaboratively with Stanford University to address the problems caused by their dam. The CA Dept of Water Resources even offered funding to investigate options to deal with the dam’s environmental liabilities. But Stanford ultimately rebuffed these efforts.

Stanford believes its dam is not subject to state or federal laws that protect fish and wildlife, as currently operated. Conservation groups disagree, and welcome NMFS’s investigation.

“While we’re disappointed that Stanford chose to take a path of resistance, avoidance, and lack of collaboration for so many years, we are happy to see that NMFS has decided that enough is enough and has opened an investigation into Stanford’s environmentally destructive dam. For years, Stanford had such a great opportunity to tap into local enthusiasm and funding for the benefit of the region and their own reputation” said BSD director Matt Stoecker.

“This investigation punctuates a decade of missed opportunities by Stanford. If the university had been a leader and innovator in its own backyard, the way it can be in any number of academic fields, they wouldn’t be in this mess. They can’t say we didn’t try to help.”

The NMFS investigation comes after years of requests from local groups that Stanford comply with state and federal laws, challenges to their controversial Habitat Conservation Plan and a State review of dam safety concern. Recently, Stanford began its Searsville Dam Alternatives Study, an internal process evaluating options for the dam’s future. The threat of an enforcement action against the university for ESA violations, which could include penalties, should motivate Stanford to complete its study process by the end of 2013, as promised.

Contacts:

Matt Stoecker – Beyond Searsville Dam, 650-380-2965
Steve Rothert – American Rivers, 530-277-0448

Federation of Fly Fishers Faire Headed For Mammoth Lakes, Sept. 13-16

The Federation of Fly Fishers are holding their first Fly Fishing Faire, including seminars, classes and fun stuff.

From their web page:

A jam-packed dawn-to-dusk schedule of fly-fishing classes, free seminars and activities is on tap for the Southwest Council Federation of Fly Fishers’ first Fly Fishing Faire, Sept. 13-16 in Mammoth Lakes, announced Michael Schweit, president of the 24 club organization.

Headquartered at Cerro Coso Community College, 101 College Parkway in Mammoth, the Faire will be a potpourri of the sport with clinics, workshops, films, casting, fly-tying, vendor displays and every aspect of the sport utilizing both the school and nearby Eastern Sierra waters.

Adult admission is $10 with children and teens age 16 and under admitted free. One admission is good for all Faire days.

Some workshops and seminars will be included in the Faire admission; other classes have separate registration or instructor and materials fees. Hours are Thurs., 2-5; Fri., 8-5; Sat.; 8-5; and Sun., 9-3.

Featured film presentation will be The International Fly Fishing Film Festival (IF4), 13 short and feature length films – about two hours – produced by professional and amateur filmmakers from all corners of the globe, showcasing the passion, lifestyle and culture of fly-fishing.

For more information, a schedule of events and other information, click here.