Scott Bar Fish Passage

array(2) {
  [0]=>
  array(3) {
    ["uid"]=>
    string(9) "541d161e7"
    ["attr"]=>
    array(18) {
      ["title"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["bg_color"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["bg_image"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["bg_position"]=>
      string(20) "no-repeat;left top;;"
      ["bg_size"]=>
      string(4) "auto"
      ["bg_video_mp4"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["bg_video_ogv"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["padding_top"]=>
      string(3) "300"
      ["padding_bottom"]=>
      string(2) "65"
      ["divider"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["decor_top"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["decor_bottom"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["navigation"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["style"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["class"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["section_id"]=>
      string(13) "better-header"
      ["visibility"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["hide"]=>
      string(0) ""
    }
    ["wraps"]=>
    array(1) {
      [0]=>
      array(4) {
        ["uid"]=>
        string(9) "0da090363"
        ["size"]=>
        string(3) "1/1"
        ["items"]=>
        array(2) {
          [0]=>
          array(4) {
            ["type"]=>
            string(6) "column"
            ["uid"]=>
            string(9) "1363625ca"
            ["size"]=>
            string(3) "1/1"
            ["fields"]=>
            array(13) {
              ["title"]=>
              string(20) "Heading, Breadcrumbs"
              ["content"]=>
              string(65) "

[le-title]

[le-project-breadcrumbs]" ["align"]=> string(0) "" ["align-mobile"]=> string(0) "" ["column_bg"]=> string(0) "" ["bg_image"]=> string(0) "" ["bg_position"]=> string(20) "no-repeat;left top;;" ["bg_size"]=> string(4) "auto" ["margin_bottom"]=> string(0) "" ["padding"]=> string(0) "" ["animate"]=> string(0) "" ["classes"]=> string(0) "" ["style"]=> string(12) "color:white;" } } [1]=> array(4) { ["type"]=> string(6) "column" ["uid"]=> string(9) "be0ba83e7" ["size"]=> string(3) "1/1" ["fields"]=> array(13) { ["title"]=> string(20) "CSS for This Section" ["content"]=> string(1430) "" ["align"]=> string(0) "" ["align-mobile"]=> string(0) "" ["column_bg"]=> string(0) "" ["bg_image"]=> string(0) "" ["bg_position"]=> string(20) "no-repeat;left top;;" ["bg_size"]=> string(4) "auto" ["margin_bottom"]=> string(3) "0px" ["padding"]=> string(0) "" ["animate"]=> string(0) "" ["classes"]=> string(0) "" ["style"]=> string(20) "height:0px!important" } } } ["attr"]=> array(9) { ["bg_color"]=> string(0) "" ["bg_image"]=> string(0) "" ["bg_position"]=> string(20) "no-repeat;left top;;" ["bg_size"]=> string(4) "auto" ["move_up"]=> string(0) "" ["padding"]=> string(0) "" ["column_margin"]=> string(0) "" ["vertical_align"]=> string(3) "top" ["class"]=> string(0) "" } } } } [1]=> array(3) { ["uid"]=> string(9) "10ec6b3e1" ["attr"]=> array(18) { ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["bg_color"]=> string(0) "" ["bg_image"]=> string(0) "" ["bg_position"]=> string(20) "no-repeat;left top;;" ["bg_size"]=> string(4) "auto" ["bg_video_mp4"]=> string(0) "" ["bg_video_ogv"]=> string(0) "" ["padding_top"]=> string(1) "0" ["padding_bottom"]=> string(1) "0" ["divider"]=> string(0) "" ["decor_top"]=> string(0) "" ["decor_bottom"]=> string(0) "" ["navigation"]=> string(0) "" ["style"]=> string(11) " full-width" ["class"]=> string(0) "" ["section_id"]=> string(0) "" ["visibility"]=> string(0) "" ["hide"]=> string(0) "" } ["wraps"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(4) { ["uid"]=> string(9) "8903a56d3" ["size"]=> string(3) "1/1" ["items"]=> array(1) { [0]=> array(4) { ["type"]=> string(6) "column" ["uid"]=> string(9) "b4fbbeade" ["size"]=> string(3) "1/1" ["fields"]=> array(13) { ["title"]=> string(0) "" ["content"]=> string(594) " Protect The BestReconnect HabitatIntegrate Fish & Working LandsSteward Source Water AreasRestore Estuaries" ["align"]=> string(6) "center" ["align-mobile"]=> string(0) "" ["column_bg"]=> string(0) "" ["bg_image"]=> string(0) "" ["bg_position"]=> string(20) "no-repeat;left top;;" ["bg_size"]=> string(4) "auto" ["margin_bottom"]=> string(0) "" ["padding"]=> string(0) "" ["animate"]=> string(0) "" ["classes"]=> string(0) "" ["style"]=> string(14) "margin-top: 0;" } } } ["attr"]=> array(9) { ["bg_color"]=> string(0) "" ["bg_image"]=> string(0) "" ["bg_position"]=> string(20) "no-repeat;left top;;" ["bg_size"]=> string(4) "auto" ["move_up"]=> string(2) "85" ["padding"]=> string(10) "22px 0 0 0" ["column_margin"]=> string(3) "0px" ["vertical_align"]=> string(3) "top" ["class"]=> string(0) "" } } } } }

Scott Bar Fish Passage

Home | Key Initiatives | Reconnect Habitat | Scott Bar Fish Passage

Project Goal:

Restore access for threatened coho salmon, steelhead, and other aquatic species to approximately three miles of year-round, cold water spawning and rearing habitat on Scott-Bar Mill Creek in the Mid-Klamath Basin


Learn More

Completed:
2024

Project Funders

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Wildlife Conservation Board

CDFW Fisheries Restoration Grant Program

Fish Affected:

Threats:

Project Description

Mill Creek is the lowermost tributary to the Scott River, which consistently generates the largest returns of wild coho salmon in California. During the fall spawning migration for coho and Chinook salmon, Mill Creek is the first tributary they encounter, and one of the only low gradient tributaries in this steep section of the Scott. In the last few years, the mainstem Scott went dry in multiple locations in the summer and early fall, due to drought and late fall rains; these conditions prevented adult salmon from accessing their typical spawning areas and impacted fisheries populations.

In July 2023, after much effort by state, federal, tribal partners, and private landowners, construction began on the Scott-Bar Mill Creek Fish Passage Restoration Project. Restoring a tributary this low in the watershed will ensure that salmon have a place to spawn, and rear, regardless of upstream conditions and drought years.

The entire Mill Creek watershed was affected by mining in the early 1900s, and the creek was moved during hydraulic mining activities. Since the 1980s, Mill Creek has been blocked to fish passage during most times of the year by a steep, bedrock cascade at the mouth and an impassable road crossing just 200 feet from its confluence with the Scott River. In July 2023, after much effort by state, federal, tribal partners, and private landowners, construction began on the Scott-Bar Mill Creek Fish Passage Restoration Project. The project replaced the road crossing with a channel spanning bridge, re-profiled the channel to improve fish passage, and restored riparian and instream habitat conditions in Mill Creek. This project restored access to threatened coho salmon, steelhead, and other aquatic species to approximately three miles of year-round, cold water spawning and rearing habitat. Project construction concluded in 2023.

Project Partners:

California Department of Fish and Wildlife

Karuk Tribe

Private landowners

Siskiyou Resource Conservation District (RCD)

Siskiyou County

More Scott River Projects

Featured News

Latest News

Privacy Policy Cookie Policy